Should Violent Video Games be Prohibited?

Should Violent Video Games be Prohibited?
Should Violent Video Games be Prohibited?

No, parents should not ban violent video games. If children are spoiled with everything, they will become entitled and self-serving. It is better to show them the consequences than to deny them the right to make mistakes.

Violent video games can promote healthy aggression, which is different from other forms of aggression that often lead to violence and unnecessary behavior in others. Banning them may be a violation of First Amendment rights. Violent video games can also be educational, showing important lessons that would otherwise not be presented to children. As long as the child is supervised by an adult any negative effects of violent video games will be controlled and therefore diminished and ultimately prevented.

 

In a study done by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in 2010, researchers asked students about their video game preferences, how much violence was tolerated in their family, and how much violence they were exposed to outside of the home. They found that players (especially young female players) who played violent video games reported more tolerance of real-life violence than those who did not play violent video games.

 

Are we as a society really more concerned with the idea of shielding our children from this type of content, and in the process, depriving them of valuable learning opportunities, than looking at the roots of the problem and trying to solve it? Marketing experts have found that violence sells. They’ve also found that what attracts many people to violent video games is not necessarily their blood and guts; it’s their challenge.

 

By providing a level playing field where kids can do some things they surely would in reality but without consequences, we’re teaching them how to control themselves better. We’re giving them a chance to resist, to earn the right to feel good. Maybe it’s not so much worse than shooting a television screen and saying, “Bang! You’re dead.”

 

Video games are helping us understand our response to violence. They’re teaching us how to do it better. The real question is: Are we as a society really more concerned with the idea of shielding our children from this type of content, and in the process, depriving them of valuable learning opportunities, than looking at the roots of the problem and trying to solve it?

 

Marketers would have you believe that violent video games are inescapable. Marketing experts have found that violence sells. They’ve also found that what attracts many people to violent video games is not necessarily their blood and guts; it’s their challenge.

 

By providing a level playing field where kids can do some things they surely would in reality but without consequences, we’re teaching them how to control themselves better. We’re giving them a chance to resist, to earn the right to feel good. Maybe it’s not so much worse than shooting a television screen and saying, “Bang! You’re dead.”

 

Video games are helping us understand our response to violence. They’re teaching us how to do it better. The real question is: Are we as a society really more concerned with the idea of shielding our children from this type of content, and in the process, depriving them of valuable learning opportunities, than looking at the roots of the problem and trying to solve

 

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